The U.S. Marshals Museum will host its fifth consecutive spring lecture series, beginning March 5, with “Jurisdiction and Judgment: Fort Smith Marshals in Indian Territory.”

The series will highlight the role of the U.S. Marshals Service as American settlement moved west in the 19th century.

“Some very interesting stories come out of this time period,” Leslie Higgins, director of education for the museum, said in a news release. “The overlapping jurisdictions of the U.S. government and independent Indian nations led to dangerous situations, with 64 deputy marshals killed in the line of duty riding out of Fort Smith.”

Higgins went on to say that with this lecture series, the community will be able to learn more about “the difficulty of the job as well as the courage of the marshals.”

All lectures will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Blue Lion, 101 N. Second St., in Fort Smith. The first lecture in the series, presented March 5, focuses on the history of Native American tribal law enforcement and their interactions with the U.S. Marshals. The lecture series will continue April 2 with a presentation about Cherokee Bill. The third and final lecture will be May 7, focusing on the incident at Going Snake.

Tickets can be purchased online or at the door for $25 for the entire series or $10 per lecture. Tickets will also be available at the door. Heavy hors d’oevres will be served and a cash bar will be available for those who will be attending.

For more information, or for help purchasing tickets, please contact Meredith Baldwin at (479) 709-3766.